Two Buncombe county men received federal prison sentences last week on child porn charges.

Posted by | April 28, 2015 0

Robert Lemarr, 42, of Leicester was sentenced to 12.5 years in a federal prison after pleading guilty last year to possessing and transporting child pornography in a case that accused him of possessing more than 100,000 pornographic images of children, including infants and toddlers.

He was sentenced on Aril 16 to spend 12.5 years in prison and ordered to serve a lifetime of supervised release, register as a sex offender and pay $20,000 as restitution to his victims.

Lemarr’s sentence came only two days after Robert Maillet, 56, of Asheville received a 148-month sentence on similar charges. Both men pleaded guilty to child porn charges in April 2014 and were sentenced last week by U.S. District Judge Martin Reidinger.

Maillet pleaded guilty to one count each of receiving- and possessing child pornography. According to a press release from the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Western District of North Carolina citing court records, law enforcement officers discovered approximately 8,000 pornographic images of children stored on computer hardware seized from Maillet’s residence. In addition to spending more than 12-years in a federal prison, Maillet will also serve a lifetime of supervised release and pay $3,000 as restitution to a victim.

Both defendants will be transferred to the custody of the Federal Bureau of Prisons upon designation of a federal facility. All federal sentences are served without the possibility of parole.

Their sentences were announced recently in a press release issued by Jill Westmoreland Rose, Acting U.S. Attorney for the Western District of North Carolina, joined by Acting Director of the North Carolina State Bureau of Investigation (SBI) B.W. Collier and Acting Asheville Police Chief Steve Belcher.

Detectives with the Asheville Police Department and State Bureau of Investigation worked both cases, with assistance from the North Carolina Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force (assisted the Lemarr case) and Homeland Security Investigations (assisted the Maillet case).

The case was brought as part of Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse, launched in May 2006 by the Department of Justice. Led by U.S. Attorneys’ offices and the Criminal Division’s Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section (CEOS), Project Safe Childhood marshals federal, state and local resources to better locate, apprehend and prosecute individuals who exploit children via the Internet, as well as to identify and rescue victims.

For more information about Project Safe Childhood, visit www.projectsafechildhood.gov.

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